What is Literature?

This seems like a fastidious thing to debate but bare with me.

The Debate

‘What is literature’ has been a hot topic of discussion for centuries, definition has always been important for academics, and they spend a large amount of time on prolonged discussions of outdated ideas. This also means new genres or contributions to literature won’t make it on the agenda for a few more decades.

Countless essays and books have been written to argue on the point of what makes literary writing literary, and not just ordinary. Often, however, these essays were written simply to argue that a genre (penny journals during the 19th century, for example) has no literary value on offer. The whole debate can easily turn into a dull gyrating war of terminology.

However, the whole debate can be simplified and broken down into two parts:

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Book Review: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón 

Goodreads: 5 Starts.

Carlos Ruiz Zafón wrote a dark and shadowy Barcelona, ‘dark’ is not the first word that comes to mind when one thinks of Barcelona but in this book the theme of ‘shadows’ and mystery is a device used to create a modern Gothic narrative. On my copy of the book, this novel is described as a ‘Thriller.’ Which it might beWhat it is, in fact, is a fusion of humour, the Gothic/ horror, and according to Zafón himself a “feel-good novel.” Which it is, including the above mentioned things, this really did makes one feel good, after making them feel all sorts of awful it circles back to a whole lot of good.

I devoured all 500+ pages in a matter of days. I’m a slow reader but by abandoning all my responsibilities, showering less, and taking the book with me to the bathroom; I was done reading in less than a week. And I regret nothing! Except that I didn’t read it sooner, thinking it was just another generic work of popular fiction. And someone may disagree, although I don’t know of many who would, but this is anything but generic.

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Dog Boy by Eva Hornung

I usually don’t like to read books that simply by their title suggest there will be tears but this text takes a well known subject and turns it into an original piece of literature. Based on the real story of Ivan Mishukov, the narrative follows little Romochka and his pack around Moscow as they learn to provide for their little family.

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