Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

 

I gobbled up every page in this book (all 500+ of them) in a matter of days. I’m a slow reader but by abandoning all my daily responsibilities, showering less, and taking the book with me to the bathroom; I was done reading in less than a week. And I regret nothing! Except maybe that I didn’t read it sooner (because I thought it would be just another generic work for the popular fiction isle). And someone may disagree but this is anything but generic. Inside this heavy tome lies a plethora of genuine and original thought. The main theme of these thoughts could be categorised under ‘Spanish history’ but under that there is still more; layers of it, which you won’t even pick up on your first reading.

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When Rain Clouds Gather by Bessie Head

“Gilbert prided himself on being an unusually well-informed man. No doubt the sun did too. No doubt the sun knew why the clouds formed and why the wind blew and why the lizards basked in its warmth, and all this immense knowledge made the sun gay and bright, full of trust and affection for mankind. But there were shut-away worlds, full of mistrust and hate, and it was about this side that Makhaya was particularly well informed.” (p. 89)

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Burnt Shadows by Kamila Shamsie 

“How [do you] explain to the earth that it was more functional as a vegetable patch than a flower garden, just as factories were more functional than schools and boys were more functional as weapons than as humans.”
Kamila Shamsie, Burnt Shadows

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